• Patients & Caregivers

Brain Connections 

Brain Connections provides information and links to validated sites about brain diseases and disorders from outside sources and from Dana publications.

 

Successful Aging & Your Brain

The Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives' Successful Aging & Your Brain program includes live public forums, printed and printable resources, and videos.

Reports on Progress

Reviews by eminent neuroscientists of specific areas of research, including normal function, disease, and new technologies. 

Briefing Papers

Briefing Papers take an in-depth look at basic and timely brain-related topics, like traumatic brain injury and obesity.


Recent Articles

Air Pollution Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia

Researchers find effects of exhaust fume particles in people who live close to busy roadways, even children.


From Fractured Genomes to Broken Minds

The discovery of genetic copy-number variants and growing data on their links to mental disorders suggest new paths of investigation and new targets for therapies.


Exercise Benefits the Healthy and Diseased Brain

At the recent Society for Neuroscience conference, researchers describe how increased movement can improve measures of brain volume and white-matter connections, as well as easing certain symptoms in people with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s.


Tracing Familial Risk of Mental Illness

How much is genetic? How much environment? Is having a depressive mother a sentence of depression? Scientists tease out hints and hope for more to help find children at most risk.


Sorting Out the Links Between Menopause and Memory Decline

New study suggests that memory changes in women in mid-life might be influenced by dropping hormonal levels.


Parsing the Puzzle of Parkinson’s Genetics

Two decades of cumulative genetic discoveries have shed light on the heritability of Parkinson’s disease and uncovered novel pathways that could provide an explanation for the progressive neuronal degeneration associated with the disease.


How Are Direct-to-Consumer-Advertisements Changing Psychiatric Drug Use?

It’s hard to say, because so few studies have looked at it. A review of the available research suggests people do ask for a drug they’ve seen advertised on TV—and doctors do give it to them.